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Eastern Medicine & Natural Healing, Health for the Body, Herbs, Nutrition, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Flavors of Spring – Pungent and Sweet

May 29, 2015
Cabbage - Pungent and Sweet

Happy Friday! We talked earlier this week about basic lifestyle, nutritional and cooking tips for the Spring season. Spring is also the best time to cook with pungent and sweet flavored foods. Both these flavors are yang in nature and energizing, qualities that reflect the active nature of spring. Cabbage, in the featured image above, have both a pungent and sweet flavor.

Pungent Flavor

The pungent flavor is a yang flavor, expansive, and dispersive. It tends to have a warming thermal nature and stimulates circulation of energy and blood, by moving this energy upwards and outwards to the periphery of the body. Pungent herbs can stimulate digestion and disperse mucus caused by mucus forming foods like dairy products and meat. It protects against mucus forming conditions like the common cold. The pungent flavor also lightens the effects of grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds, which have a tendency to build mucus in the body.

In general, the pungent flavor has these effects on the organs:

1) Enters and clears the lungs of mucus conditions.
2) Improves digestion and rids gas from the intestines.
3) Moistens the kidneys, which affect fluids throughout your body (eg ginger increases saliva and sweat in the body).
4) Stimulates blood circulation and strengthens the heart.
5) Clears obstruction and improves a sluggish liver function.

Pungent flavored foods benefit those who are sluggish, dull, lethargic, or overweight. Those who are overweight from overeating should choose cooling pungents. Those with cold signs will benefit from warming pungents. Warming pungents should be used with caution if you have heat signs. This flavor also helps those who are thin (with dry condition – more on dryness later) or those who tend to be nervous and restless (wind condition – review the properties of wind here). The seed pungents relax the nervous system and improve digestion. These include fennel, dill, caraway, anise, coriander, and cumin. Pungent roots are stimulants but also help stabilize and increase circulation. These include ginger, cooked onion, and horseradish.

Contraindications of pungents: some pungents will actually worsen those who are “dry” or “windy” (above). Sage, raw onion, and all hot peppers (especially cayenne), worsen these conditions. In general, those with deficiency in qi or stagnant qi (seen with liver problems) should avoid these foods.

Examples of different pungents:

Warming pungents : spearmint, rosemary, scallion, garlic and all onion family members, cinnamon bark and branch, cloves, fresh and dried ginger root, black pepper, all hot peppers, cayenne, fennel, anise, dill, mustard greens, horseradish, basil, bay leaf, nd nutmeg.

Cooling pungents: peppermint, marjoram, elder flowers, white pepper, and radish and its leaves.

Diaphoretic pungent herbs that induce sweating for the common cold: ginger, mint, cayenne, elderflower, scallions, garlic, and chamomile.

Neutral pungents: taro, turnip, and kohlrabi

(Note: For those with cold signs or coldness, the best warming pungent herbs to use are dried ginger and cinnamon. They are deeply warming for a relatively long period of time and gentle on the system. This is opposed to cayenne and other hot peppers, which are also warming, but so extreme that they quickly change to a cooling effect. Also, for the full effect of pungent flavored foods, it’s best to eat them raw or pickled as simmering and steaming can diminish the pungent properties. Leafy herbs such as mints should be steeped, and barks and roots like ginger and cinnamon should be simmered.)

Sweet Flavored Foods

Sweet flavored foods like grains, legumes, seeds, and sweet starchy vegetables like young beets and carrots are also best eaten during the spring. The sweet flavor, which is also yang in nature, increases energy, especially in combination with warming foods. Sweet foods also build the yin of the body (building and nourishing fluids in the body), and strengthen weakness and deficiency symptoms.

Sweet foods, in the form of complex carbohydrates, are usually the foundation of most traditional diets. They energize but also relax the body, nerves, and brain. Complex carbs, such as grains, vegetables, and legumes, that are more warming can also treat cold signs and deficiency symptoms.

Sweet flavored foods have these effects on our organs:

1) Enters and strengthens the spleen-pancreas, or digestive system.
2) Appropriate for the liver as it soothes aggressive liver emotions such as anger and impatience. Sweet foods have been traditionally used to calm acute liver attacks.
3) Sweet foods also reverse dry conditions of the lungs through a lubricating action on the lungs and calms an overactive heart and mind.

Examples of Sweet Flavored Foods

Warming sweet foods help to acclimate to springtime. These include: spearmint (also pungent), sweet rice, sweet potato, mochi, rice syrup, molasses, sunflower seeds, pinenuts, walnuts, and cherries.

Neutral sweet foods: cabbage, carrots, shiitake mushrooms, figs, yams, and peas.

Sweet flavored foods benefit those who are dry, cold, nervous, thin, and weak. The sweet flavor will help increase their energy and strength. They are contraindicated in those who are sluggish, overweight, obese, or those who tend to have increased mucus in their systems. Eating sweet flavored foods will exacerbate these conditions. Also, in Chinese medicine, eating too much sweet flavored foods can damage the kidneys and spleen/pancreas (digestive system), weaken our bones and may cause hair loss (from the head). As I have always emphasized, balance and moderation is key!

Have a great weekend and happy eating!

In health and wellness,
Dr Elain

References:
Healing with Whole Foods by Paul Pitchford

 

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Ayurvedic Medicine, Eastern Medicine & Natural Healing, Health for the Body, Herbs, Nutrition, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Nutritional and Lifestyle Tips for the Spring Season

May 27, 2015
Spring Flowers

I hope everyone is having a great week! The year is flying by and before summer creeps up on us, I wanted to go over some nutritional and lifestyle tips for the Spring season. The Chinese believed that the seasons have a cyclical influence on human growth, development, and well-being. Climatic changes occur with each season and the best way to stay healthy is to live in harmony with these changes.

Spring Basics

Spring represents new beginnings, cleansing, and rejuvenation. This is when seeds sprout into plants, flowers bloom, and the sun shines brightly. It is the time of year to wake up early with the sun and take walks in the morning. It is a time to be active and expend energy. These are all yang activities that reflect the “ascending and active nature of spring.” If you look at plants and vegetation in the spring, their actions mimic this yang action. Plants and flowers grow upwards towards the sun after a time of hibernation during the winter.

The five elements of Chinese medicine are wood, fire, earth, metal, and water (more on this fundamental concept soon). Spring is represented by the Wood element. Wood symbolizes plants, nature, and new growth, all seen during the spring season. The internal organ associated with spring is the liver and gallbladder. If you recall my post from last month on the external pathogenic factors and spring wind, the liver is the organ that is most affected during the spring (read more here), which is why we should pay close attention to the liver and gallbladder during this time.

Usually during spring, we should eat less, and even occasionally fast, to cleanse the body of the fats and heavy foods eaten during winter. Have you noticed that during the holiday season you may eat more heavy and fatty foods, feeling the need to go on that healthy detox diet after the new year? The Spring diet should be the lightest and the foods should represent the yang, ascending, and expansive qualities of spring. These foods include young plants, fresh greens, and sprouts. It is best to avoid salty and heavy or fattier foods which have a more sinking and descending energy. These types of foods stagnate the liver which can lead to indigestion and other liver problems.

Here are some basic concepts to remember about the Spring season:

  • Five elements: Wood
  • Organs: Liver and Gallbladder
  • Sense Organ: Eyes/Sight
  • Tissue: Tendons and sinews (ligaments)
  • Emotion: Anger and impatience
  • Voice Sound: Shouting
  • Fluid Emitted: Tears
  • Paramita (Way to correct imbalance): Patience
  • Enviromental Influence: Wind
  • Development: Birth
  • Color: Green
  • Taste: Sour
  • Direction: East

“Spring” into Spring

1) Eat your Greens – The color green is associated with springtime and the liver. As I mentioned above, this is the time to eat, fresh leafy greens, sprouts, young plants, and raw foods. This will ultimately strengthen your liver and improve it’s overall function, which is to control the overall smooth movement of Qi in our bodies (review the function of Qi here).

2) Stretch, stretch, and stretch! – The liver controls our tendons and ligaments. When we are at rest, the liver stores our blood and releases blood to our tendons during activity, which helps to maintain flexibility and tendon health. When we are stressed, angry, and impatient, this tightens our tendons making us less flexible physically. When we are less flexible physically, we also become less flexible emotionally which leads to more anger and impatience as well as other aggressive emotions (review the emotions associated with the liver here). Take time to stretch a little every morning. In general, it is important to stretch every day, all year round.

3) Protect your Eyes – Our eyes are a reflection of our liver health and vice versa (i.e., if your liver is healthy, your eyes are also healthy). Make sure you wear sunglasses with UV protection when you are outdoors and rest your eyes after long periods of time in front of the computer. Supplement with Omega-3’s which contain DHA crucial for eye health (review Omega-3’s here). Lutein and zeaxanthin supplements may also be helpful for those with more serious eye issues (more on these supplements later).

4) Eat Sour Foods – The flavor associated with the liver is sour (review The Five Flavors here). Sour flavored foods can stimulate and strengthen the liver. An easy way to do this is add slices of lemon into your water, which will also help to stimulate digestion. Squeezing lime onto beef or chicken is a great way to brighten flavors. Using oil and vinegar in your salad dressing is also a simple way to add “sour” to your diet.

5) Increase Outdoor Activities – Outdoor activities are yang in nature and will also help move stagnant liver qi. Hiking, swimming, and biking are all great outdoor activities that will easily stimulate and circulate energy.

Raw Food During Spring

Spring, which is the first season of the year, also represents youth, vitality and raw energy. Because of this, raw and sprouted foods can be eaten more during the springtime, which reflect the young and early stages of food. Raw foods are cleansing and cooling. According to Ayurvedic medicine, raw foods are vatic (vata) or “wind-like” which encourages quickness, rapid movements, and outward activity, much like yang energy.

Raw foods should be consumed more in those with heat signs, those living in warmer climates, and during times of greater physical activity. A little bit of raw food daily is cleansing for the body, and should be consumed more during spring and summertime. However, be careful not to overdo it with raw foods as it can also weaken digestion and may cause excessive detoxification of your system, resulting in fatigue and stomach symptoms like indigestion and diarrhea. Do not eat raw foods if you have bowel inflammation or weakness and deficiency symptoms.

Spring Cooking

Finally, when you’re cooking during the spring, it’s best to cook food for shorter periods of time, but at higher temperatures. This way, your food is not thoroughly cooked, especially the inner part of the food, preserving some of the raw energy of the food. Also if using oil, quick high temperature sauteing or stir frying is the best way to go.

Happy spring eating!

In health and wellness,
Dr. Elain

References:

Healing with Whole Foods by Paul Pitchford

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Eastern Medicine & Natural Healing, Health for the Body, Herbs, Nutrition, Supplements, Traditional Chinese Medicine

The Six External Pathogenic Factors and Spring Wind

April 21, 2015
Spring Wind

I hope everyone is enjoying their Spring so far! I want to introduce another concept in Chinese medicine that we are all affected by. The six external pathogenic factors refer to environmental or climatic factors that may cause internal disease in our bodies. We are especially susceptible to these climatic changes if they are stronger than usual or if our body’s qi or immune system, is weak compared to the climatic change.

What are the six external pathogenic factors?

The six external causes of disease are:

  • Wind
  • Cold
  • Heat
  • Dampness
  • Dryness
  • Fire

Usually, weather should not have a pathological effect on the body, as our bodies are designed to withstand these changes in weather and protect against them. The exterior of the body, which includes the skin, muscles, nose, and mouth, function to defend the body from these pathogenic factors. The weather causes disease only when our bodies and Defensive Qi are relatively weak compared to the climatic factor. I say “relatively” weak since you don’t have to be extremely weak for the pathogenic factor to invade your body. These exterior factors can invade a relatively strong and healthy person if it is stronger than that person’s body energy at that point in time. Make sense?

A person’s basic constitutional make-up, which is different in everyone, will also determine which exterior pathogenic factor will affect them the most. Someone who is born with a hotter constitution (heat intolerant) will tend to be more affected by heat and dryness, while someone who is more cold intolerant will be more affected by wind and cold.

Each pathogenic factor is also associated with a season during which it is more prevalent. However, pathogenic factors can occur during any season.

  • Wind – Spring
  • Heat – Summer
  • Dryness – Autumn
  • Cold – Winter
  • Dampness – Late Summer
  • Fire – Summer

While these pathogenic factors invade the exterior first, the internal organs may also be affected if there is already weakness and disharmony in that organ system. Once it invades the body, they can easily change their nature. Wind-Cold can easily turn into Heat. Dampness can also generate Heat. Extreme Heat can turn into Wind.

The climatic factors will trigger certain clinical symptoms indicative of that climate. That is, the symptoms your body experiences mimics the pattern and behavior of the pathogenic factor. So not only is the pathogenic factor a “cause” of the disease, but the behavior of it becomes clinically relevant as “patterns of disharmony” in the body that need to be treated. I will give examples to make this easier to understand.

Spring External Wind

Since we are in the heart of spring, I will focus on Wind and its clinical manifestations of the body. Wind is yang in nature and tends to injure the blood and yin of our bodies. Wind can carry other pathogenic factors into the body (i.e., cold can enter the body as Wind-Cold and heat can enter the body as Wind-Heat). Like wind, the symptoms happen quickly and can change rapidly.

The behavior of wind include:

  • rapid onset
  • causes rapid changes in signs and symptoms
  • causes signs and symptoms to move from one area to another area of the body
  • can cause tremors, convulsions, as well as stiffness and paralysis (extreme cases: Parkinson’s and stroke)
  • affects the top part of the body (especially the head and neck)
  • attacks the lungs first
  • affects the skin
  • can cause itching

Wind-Cold Signs and Symptoms – aversion to cold or wind, shivering, sneezing and cough, runny nose with white-watery mucus, no fever or slight fever (seen more with Wind-Heat), severe occipital stiffness and aching, itchy throat, possible sweating (Wind-Cold with a stronger cold component will have no sweating as cold contracts pores, while Wind-Cold with a stronger wind component will have slight sweating, since the pores are open), no thirst. Tongue body color – no change with thin-white coating. Floating-tight pulse.

Wind-Heat Signs and Symptoms – aversion to cold, shivering, sneezing, cough, runny nose with yellow mucus, fever, occipital stiffness and aching, slight sweating, sore throat, swollen tonsils, thirst. Tongue body color – red on the tips or sides, thin-white coating. Floating-rapid pulse.

(Note: Chinese Medicine uses the tongue and pulse to diagnose diseases. Tongue diagnosis is based on the color, shape, coating, and moisture of the tongue while pulse diagnosis is more complex. These subjects will require their own posts!)

Do the signs and symptoms of Wind-Cold and Wind-Heat sound familiar? Yes, it’s the common cold or flu. When these symptoms are not promptly addressed or your body’s constitution and defenses are too weak to fight them, the symptoms can invade deeper into the body and cause more severe respiratory problems such as bronchitis, upper respiratory infections, and pneumonia. From a Western medicine perspective, the common cold is caused by viruses, not bacteria, which is why antibiotics don’t work on a cold.  We have viruses and bacteria in our bodies all the time. It is not until our defenses (“Defensive Qi” or immune system) are compromised that our bodies cannot handle them and we get sick.

Finally, the internal organ that is most affected by Wind in the body is your liver. According to the Five Element Theory, Wind is associated with the season of Spring, the Wood element, and the Liver (more about this later). Exterior Wind can aggravate an already weakened Liver disharmony in the body which can cause stiff neck and headaches. It can also “stir” Blood (since wind moves) stored in the Liver manifesting symptoms of skin rashes that will start suddenly and move all over the body (e.g. urticaria and hives).

Note: I have been talking about “external” wind, from climatic changes. Internal wind, can also cause disease. Some of the clinical manifestations may be similar to external wind, but it is mainly caused by Liver weakness and disharmony (i.e., Liver issues will cause internal wind in your body).

What are practical ways to prevent and treat the common cold?

Wind usually enters the back of the neck under the occiput, while cold enters the bottoms of the feet or the base of the neck. If you are already cold intolerant, it’s important to keep your feet warm on colder days and wear a scarf to protect your neck on windier days. We are most vulnerable to catching colds during season changes, especially winter into spring, or summer into fall. Poor nutrition, lack of sleep, too much alcohol, overwork, and increased stress will also make us more susceptible to getting sick.

When we get sick, supportive care is usually the best way to get through a cold. Increase your fluid intake (water is best) and get plenty of rest and sleep. Adding lemon, ginger, and honey to warm or room temp water can also help wind-cold symptoms, as lemon strengthens your liver, ginger can clear wind and is slightly warming, while honey is soothing to your throat. Try to stay away from cold or iced drinks which can increase phlegm and mucus in your body, aggravating symptoms. It is important to spit out any phlegm (whether you have cold or heat symptoms) since swallowing it back into your system will keep the pathogen in your body longer.

If you are more internally hot, a cold can quickly turn into Wind-Heat in your body. Feeling warm or flushed, fever, sore throat, and yellow mucus are early signs of Wind-Heat in your body. Focus on drinking fluids only (water, dilute juices, and herbal teas such as green or peppermint tea, which can clear heat symptoms – green tea and peppermint have a cooling thermal nature). Eat only if you are truly hungry as fasting for a day can clear heat from your body quickly.

If you are not sweating, it may be helpful to induce sweating to release the pathogen (in both wind-cold and wind-heat). In this case, drink a strong cup of ginger tea followed by a hot bath until your entire body is sweating. Once this happens, stay in for another 5 minutes, dry off completely, cloth yourself completely to avoid exposure to cold, and then take a long nap.

Food, herbs, and supplements for the common cold

For Wind-Cold:

Anti-wind herbs  – ginger, fennel, basil, anise, and valerian – can also use cinnamon, garlic, and onions (which all have detoxifying properties)
Wind-cold reducers: oats, pine nuts, shrimp

For Wind-Heat:

Anti-wind herbs – peppermint and peony root
Wind-heat reducers: celery, mulberry, strawberry

For both Wind-Cold and Wind-Heat:

Wind reducers with a neutral thermal nature – black soybeans, back sesame seed, fresh flax oil, herbs – sage and chamomile
Pears, especially Asian pears, are good for cough and help to moisten the lungs.

Foods to avoid:

Wind aggravators : eggs, crabmeat, and buckwheat

Phlegm producing foods: all dairy products, bananas, sugar, cold drinks, alcohol, rich and heavy foods (phlegm and mucus are perfect breeding grounds for virus and bacteria)

Supplements and Herbs

Vitamin C – A meta-analysis of 29 trials in a total of 11,306 participants found that supplementing with 200mg Vitamin C daily did not reduce the frequency of colds, but did reduce the severity and duration of colds.

Echinacea – Lab and animal studies suggest that echinacea contains substances that enhance our immune systems, relieve pain, reduce inflammation and may have anti-viral and anti-oxidant effects. One study found that of 95 people with early symptoms of cold and flu, those who drank several cups of echinacea tea every day for 5 days felt better sooner than those who drank tea without echinacea. Echinacea has been found to work well with Vitamin C.

Tinctures are the best way to take echinacea since they are better absorbed and easier on the stomach than taking capsules. Drink 1-3ml or (20-90 drops) of a 1:5 tincture, added to warm water or tea, 3-4 times a day.

Goldenseal – This is also used in conjunction with echinacea to treat colds, but because it is cooling, it should only be used with symptoms of wind-heat. The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) is currently funding studies on possible anti-bacterial mechanisms and cholesterol lowering effects of goldenseal.

Reishi – This medicinal mushroom has long been known for its immune boosting properties. It should be used more for long-term immune building and prevention rather than treatment of acute colds. (More on this soon.)

Your cold should generally resolve in 7-10 days and you shouldn’t need to take supplements and herbs for longer than this. If your symptoms don’t improve, go see your doctor!

What do you do when you catch a cold?

In health and wellness,
Dr. Elain

References:

The Foundations of Chinese Medicine by Giovanni Maciocia
Healing with Whole Foods by Paul Pitchford

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