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Eastern Medicine & Natural Healing, Health for the Body, Herbs, Nutrition, Traditional Chinese Medicine

Ginger – The Root That Should Be In Everyone’s Fridge

April 25, 2016
Sliced Ginger Root

Happy Spring everyone! I hope that everyone is doing well and didn’t get too stressed out from tax season. I love spring because it is a time to start on new projects! (Review my post on nutritional and lifestyle tips for the spring season here.) Today’s post is the beginning of many food posts. I am a firm believer of using food as medicine, and today’s topic is no exception. Ginger has been touted for its many medicinal properties including stimulating digestion, treating colds and fevers, and alleviating nausea from chemotherapy.

Ginger is a root or rhizome, an enlarged underground stem that can be eaten fresh, dried, powdered, or as a juice. It is shaped like a palm with fingers and produced in tropical India, Jamaica, Fiji, Indonesia, and Australia. Part of the Zingiberaceae family, ginger’s siblings include cardamom and turmeric (two other important anti-inflammatory herbs).  The word ginger literally means “spirit” “liveliness” and “verve” (or vigor). And you will see that it does just that — it invigorates the body by increasing energy and circulation.

Here are some of the basic properties and functions to remember about ginger:

  • pungent flavor (review the five flavors here)
  • warming thermal nature (thermal nature review here)
  • stimulates digestion
  • boosts circulation and respiration
  • can treat colds and fevers
  • used for nausea from chemotherapy or morning sickness from pregnancy
  • anti-inflammatory by alleviating pain from arthritis
  • may normalize blood pressure
  • supports the liver and promotes bile release

Common Cold

Ginger is one of the first things you should reach for if you find yourself coming down with a cold or fever. It is a natural diaphoretic that stimulates perspiration, detoxifying the body and bringing our temperatures down. Its anti-inflammatory properties help to boost our immune systems and reduce pain or bodyaches. It also acts as an anti-histamine and decongestant, helping to ease cold symptoms. Add a slice of ginger, lemon, and honey to warm or room temp water as soon as you start feeling symptoms of a cold. Review my post on the common cold here.

Digestion Issues

The phenolic compounds found in this root help decrease gastric irritation by stimulating saliva and bile production. Studies have found that it can increase the rate of gastric emptying and stomach contractions in those with indigestion without affecting or decreasing their gut’s intrinsic peptides (proteins). It has also been found to inhibit H. pylori, which may help prevent ulcers as well as protect gastric mucosa.

Nausea

Research has shown that pregnancy related nausea and vomiting as well as morning sickness can be reduced by taking 1 gram of  ginger daily in short periods (up to 4 days), while several studies have found that ginger is better than placebo in relieving morning sickness. Pregnant women please consult your physician and do not take more than 1 gram/day.

Chemotherapy induced nausea can also be combated with ginger. This study showed that adult cancer patients on chemotherapy who took 0.5 – 1 g doses of ginger daily significantly aided in reduction of severity from acute chemotherapy-induced nausea.

Anti-inflammatory and pain reduction

Ginger has been known to be a great anti-inflammatory agent. A study in 2013 found that women athletes that took 3 grams of ginger or cinnamon daily had decreased their muscle soreness significantly. It has also been shown to be as effective as ibuprofen in relieving menstrual cramps.

Diabetes

The effects of ginger on diabetes may be simultaneously therapeutic and preventative. A comprehensive review of diabetic patients who took 3 grams of powdered ginger daily for 30 days have shown that it decreases blood glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. It has a positive effect on diabetes because it inhibits enzymes in carbohydrate metabolism and increases insulin release and sensitivity.

Cancer

Several studies on ginger in the last ten years have shown promising results with fighting cancer. In 2007, a study published by the BMC Complementary and Alternative medicine, found that “[it] inhibits growth and modulates secretion of angiogenic factors in ovarian cancer cells.” Another study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center discovered that ginger actually caused the death of ovarian cancer cells in a lab. Finally a study in 2012 published by the British Journal of Nutrition found that this versatile root “exerts significant growth-inhibitory and death-inductory effects in a spectrum of prostate cancer cells.” It seems that different cancers respond similarly to ginger and more studies need to be done to confirm this theory.

Using ginger in your diet

Ginger goes well with many types of food including seafood, sushi, meats, veggies, and fruits such as oranges, melons, and apples. Have you noticed that sushi is always paired with a stack of thinly sliced ginger? This is because it removes toxins from raw seafood. It adds flavor to pork and balances the coldness of veggies and fruits with its warming thermal nature. Add it to your next smoothie or juice, stir fry in veggies and meats, mix in raw with your salads, steep in water with lemon and honey to make tea, or add to any seafood recipe to not only spice things up but also detoxify.

When buying in the supermarket, the freshest root will have smooth and taut skin (without wrinkles) and a spicy, pungent aroma. The hands and fingers of the root should be firm and plump, and the flesh is juicy when fresh. To best preserve, store in a tightly wrapped plastic bag in the fridge or freezer. Ginger should be peeled and easiest to use in your dishes when grated but can also be thinly sliced.

Contraindications

Ginger is safe for most people and usually causes little side effects. Excessive use may cause digestive upset and can exacerbate acid reflux in some people so use sparingly if you are prone to this. Do not use if you have a gallstones.

Remember that when eating, balance is key and your diet should always contain a variety of different foods.

I hope you enjoyed this post on ginger. Feel free to leave questions in the comments section. Have a great week!

In health and wellness,

Dr. Elain

References:

Healing with Whole Foods by Paul Pitchford

The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia by Rebecca Woods

Ginger’s Many Evidenced-Based Health Benefits Revealed by Joseph Mercola

 

 

 

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Magnificent Magnesium Deficiency Continued

April 17, 2015
Dark Chocolate for Magnesium Deficiency

Earlier this week, we discussed the intricate relationship between calcium and magnesium (read more about it here), and established the current dilemma we have with overemphasis on calcium consumption while minimizing the importance of magnesium. Because of this, an estimated 80% of Americans are deficient in magnesium. Not only is magnesium necessary for over 300 biochemical reactions in the body and responsible for a host of basic functions such as muscle contraction, nerve conduction, and our heartbeats, but studies have now shown that it may prevent heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and osteoporosis.

What are the risk factors for magnesium deficiency?

  • age – Our ability to absorb anything decreases with age. The elderly are also more likely to be on medications that may interfere with magnesium absorption.
  • over-exercising – Magnesium is lost in sweat.
  • menopause – Magnesium levels fluctuate with menstrual cycles and decrease even more after menopause. (Ever wonder why you crave chocolate before your period? It could be magnesium deficiency.)
  • diabetes – Diabetics have increased magnesium loss in their urine, especially if poorly controlled.
  • kidney disease – Those with unhealthy kidneys will also lose magnesium through their urine.
  • malabsorption or gut problems – Digestive problems such as Crohn’s disease or leaky gut syndrome will interfere with your ability to absorb magnesium.
  • use of certain medications – Diuretics, antibiotics, and certain cancer medications can result in magnesium deficiency as they interfere with its absorption.
  • eating processed foods with high sugar content and drinking soda – This depletes magnesium in our bodies, since magnesium is used to metabolize and detoxify these foods.
  • alcoholism – Alcoholics tend to have low magnesium levels.
  • exposure to heavy metals and environmental chemicals – Magnesium is depleted through detoxification of these exposures.

What does magnesium deficiency cause?

According to Dr. Carolyn Dean, a leading researcher in magnesium and author of the book, The Magnesium Miracle, magnesium deficiency has been found to trigger 22 medical problems including:

  • anxiety and panic attacks
  • asthma
  • blood clots
  • bowel diseases
  • cystitis
  • depression
  • detoxification
  • diabetes
  • fatigue
  • heart disease
  • hypertension
  • hypoglycemia
  • insomnia
  • kidney disease
  • liver disease
  • migraines
  • musculoskeletal conditions (e.g. cramps, fibromyalgia, chronic back pain)
  • nerve problems
  • obstetrics and gynecology (e.g. PMS, infertility, preeclampsia)
  • osteoporosis
  • Raynaud’s syndrome
  • tooth decay

Review: How do I know if I am magnesium deficient?

Early signs and symptoms of magnesium deficiency include fatigue, nausea, headaches, loss of appetite and weakness. Signs of chronic magnesium deficiency may lead to more serious symptoms of numbness and tingling, muscle contractions and cramps, seizures, coronary spasms, abnormal heart rhythms, and even personality changes. An easy way to find out if you are deficient is to get a magnesium RBC test. The “normal values” are between 4.2-6.8mg/dl, but you really want your levels to be 6mg/dl or higher. Once you find out your baseline, check every 3 months to make sure you are taking enough to maintain your levels. According to Dr Dean, unlike most medications, “as your body becomes saturated with magnesium, your body will need less, not more, to maintain these levels.”

How do I increase my magnesium levels?

The foods with highest concentrations of magnesium (per 100mg or 3.5 oz) include:

– seaweed: kelp (780mg), dried agar (770mg)
– dark leafy greens: kale (88mg), swiss chard (86mg), and baby spinach (87mg) (if it’s green, it’s got magnesium, as it plays a central role in the chlorophyll molecule)
– nuts and seeds: pumpkin seeds (534 mg), flaxseed (392mg), sunflower seeds (325mg), almonds (286 mg), Brazil nuts (376mg), and walnuts (201mg)
– fish: mackerel (97mg), halibut (83mg), and wild salmon (37mg)
– legumes: soybeans (86 mg), lima beans (188mg)
– avocado: 58 mg in one avocado (another great reason to eat one a day!)
– dried fruit: dried figs (68mg), dried apricots (62mg)
– cocoa and bitter chocolate: ounce for ounce, dark chocolate (with cocoa content over 80%) delivers the most magnesium (327 mg)

Review: Magnesium supplements

With the depletion of magnesium in our soil, we are probably only getting 200 mg of magnesium from our daily diet versus 500mg in the past. The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of magnesium for young adults is 400mg for men and 310mg for women. In adults over 30, the RDA is 420mg for men and 320mg for women. It is important and necessary to supplement and perhaps even double this recommended allowance through food and supplements, especially if you have stress in your life (who doesn’t?), as stress uses up our magnesium stores even more.

Magnesium glycinate provides the highest level of magnesium absorption. Metagenics comes in 100mg tablets (take 2 twice a day for a total of 400mg/day) and OrthoMolecular Products offers 235mg in 2 tablets (also taken twice daily for a total of 470mg). It is probably best to start with the recommended dosage and adjust according to your levels.

The many benefits of magnesium

1) Magnesium protects the heart.

Studies have reported a a 34% lower risk of sudden cardiac death in women who took higher levels of magnesium. When a heart attack occurs, there can be increased damage to heart muscle when calcium rushes into the muscle. Blood clots can block blood vessels to the heart. Decreased circulation can cause blood vessels to constrict. New formed arrhythmia in the injured area can occur. Magnesium counteracts these events by dilating blood vessels, preventing spasm in the blood vessels and heart, opposing the action of calcium which increases spasm (remember, magnesium is the “calming” mineral with a relaxing action), dissolving blood clots, lessening the site of injury thereby preventing arrhythmia, and using its antioxidant activity against free radicals that may form at the injury site.

2) Magnesium may prevent diabetes.

Magnesium reduces insulin resistance. In a study with overweight subjects, the group taking 365 mg of magnesium daily for 6 months had lower fasting blood sugar levels and less insulin resistance than the control group. It seems that magnesium controls the activation of the enzyme tyrosine kinase, which is required for proper functioning of our insulin receptors.

3) Magnesium may prevent and treat symptoms of stroke.

A study found that for every 100mg increase in magnesium intake, risk of stroke was decreased by 8%. Intravenous magnesium has also been used for neuroprotection in patients with acute stroke.

4) Magnesium may prevent osteoporosis and hip fractures.

Magnesium is involved in bone formation and bone health. It regulates osteoblast activity (cells involved in bone formation) as well as osteoclast activity (cells involve in bone breakdown). It influences parathyroid hormone and vitamin D, which are both major regulators of bone homeostasis. Researchers also discovered that women with osteoporosis had lower serum levels of magnesium than women with osteopenia or women without osteoporosis or osteopenia. In Norway, a study found that those who drank water with magnesium had a lower risk of hip fracture in both men and women.

4) Magnesium has been used in colorectal cancer prevention.

Higher intakes of dietary magnesium was correlated with lower risk of colorectal cancer. The data from this study showed that for every 100mg increase in magnesium intake, the risk of colorectal cancer tumor decreased by 13% while colorectal cancer risk decreased by 12%.

5) Magnesium promotes weight loss.

Finally, we see a positive correlation between magnesium intake and weight loss. The more magnesium we have in our bodies, the more our bodies are able to regulate insulin and control our blood sugar levels, leading to prevention of diabetes and obesity.

Hopefully, I’ve give you plenty of incentive to check your magnesium levels and start supplementing as needed! Have a great weekend!

In health and wellness,
Dr. Elain

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Cholesterol – Facts and Myths

April 6, 2015
High Cholesterol Foods

Cholesterol has gotten so much recent press that I feel it is a topic that needs to be addressed. Last month, a 6 year Finnish study of 9,000 men concluded that the cholesterol lowering medication, atorvastatin and simvastatin, increased the risk of Type 2 diabetes by up to 46% – the higher the dosage, the greater the risk. It appears that statins “increase a person’s insulin resistance” and also “impair the ability of the pancreas to secrete insulin.” And now, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) is saying that “cholesterol is not considered a nutrient of concern for overconsumption.” So what is going on? Cholesterol lowering medication is causing a disease (diabetes) that can lead to a disease (heart disease) that it was originally trying to prevent? And we shouldn’t be concerned about having too much cholesterol in our diets? It seems that everything about cholesterol originally ingrained in our knowledge has done a complete 180. Let’s get the facts straight.

Cholesterol 101 – What is it and why do we need it?

  • Cholesterol is not a fat, but a steroid alcohol that is not water soluble. Around 75% of the cholesterol in our bodies is produced in the liver while the other 25% comes from food.
  • Cholesterol is essential for the production of all our cell membranes, bile acids (for digestion, fat metabolism, and elimination of cholesterol), sex hormones (such as testosterone, estrogen, progesterone), adrenal hormones (such as cortisol, DHEA, aldosterone), and Vitamin D (read more about Vitamin D here).
  • It maintains structure in our cells and blood vessels, and regulates protein pathways for cell signaling and communication between all our cells.
  • It is essential in our nervous systems, helping us with learning, memory, and cognitive function.

Our brains, which constitute only 2% of our body weight, contain 25% of the cholesterol in our bodies, and most of that 25% is made in our brains when we sleep. This is why babies sleep so much — while they sleep their brains are making more cholesterol to help them grow and develop. Infants and toddlers also need adequate amounts of cholesterol in their diets for proper brain development. For the elderly, it was found that those with high cholesterol in their brains had the best memory function, while those with low cholesterol had a higher risk for depression and even death! For all of us in between, it goes without saying that we also need cholesterol to function properly.

Ok, so now we have established that cholesterol is very important and ESSENTIAL to life.

If cholesterol is so good, why do statins even exist??

Let’s define the main components that make up cholesterol.

LDL – This is the “bad cholesterol” contributing to plaque build up in your arteries causing them to harden, also known as atherosclerosis. If a blood clot forms and blocks a narrowed artery, then a heart attack or stroke may result. However, what is not commonly known is that there is “good” LDL and “bad” LDL as well. According to Dr. Ron Rosedale, M.D.:

“LDL particles come in many sizes and large LDL particles are not a problem. Only the so-called small dense LDL particles can potentially be a problem, because they can squeeze through the lining of the arteries and if they oxidize, otherwise known as turning rancid, they can cause damage and inflammation.”

HDL – This is the good cholesterol that carries LDL away from the arteries and back to the liver where it is processed and eliminated.

Triglycerides – This is fat that contributes to atherosclerosis. It is caused by being overweight or obese, lack of exercise, alcohol, smoking, and a diet high in carbohydrates (more than 60% of total calories). High triglycerides are actually a higher risk factor than LDL for developing diabetes and heart disease. (You’ll see why in a second).

VLDL – Very low density lipoproteins are considered bad cholesterols.

Lipoprotein (a) or Lp(a) are made up of LDL plus a protein (apoprotein a). High levels of Lp(a) also contribute to diabetes and heart disease.

Total cholesterol (TC) is the sum of all the above components.

So how do statins work?

Statins block the synthesis of cholesterol by inhibiting an enzyme in the liver called HMG-CoA reductase. This enzyme is what controls the production of cholesterol in the liver.

The problem is that HMG-CoA reductase also makes CoQ-10 in our bodies which is a major energy source for our hearts and responsible for energy production in all our cells. Therefore statins also decrease CoQ-10.

Statins increase insulin levels in our bodies. Chronically elevated insulin levels can cause inflammation and ironically, heart disease. Isn’t this the reason why people are prescribed statins — to decrease heart disease? Elevated insulin levels may also cause high blood pressure, heart attacks, thyroid issues, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s and even cancer.

Statins increase the risk of diabetes because it raises your blood sugar levels. How? Excess sugar that you eat from a meal is shunted to the liver where it should then be processed and stored into cholesterol and triglycerides. If the cholesterol production is blocked, then the sugar is kicked out of the liver and back into your blood stream, raising your blood sugar levels, which increases your risk of diabetes. This is exactly what the researchers in Finland discovered in their study.

How do I know if I’m at risk for heart disease?

If you visit your PCP or cardiologist, they will check your lipid profile to assess your risk for heart disease. The old school of thought is that your total cholesterol should be 200mg/dl or lower and under 150mg/dl if you already have heart disease. Your HDL should be over 40mg/dl, your LDL should be under 100mg/dl or under 70mg/dl for high risk patients, and your triglycerides should be under 150mg/dl. (Note: The lipid panel should be done fasting.)

Better and more accurate indicators of your risk for heart disease is using the following criteria according to Dr. Joseph Mercola:

1) HDL/Total Cholesterol Ratio : Divide your HDL by your Total Cholesterol and multiply by 100. This should ideally be 24% or higher. If your ratio is 10% or lower, then you are at significant risk.

2) Triglyceride/HDL Ratio: Divide your triglycerides by your HDL. This should ideally be under 2.

I’ll use my own numbers to illustrate 1 and 2 above.

TC = 194  HDL = 68 LDL = 116 Triglycerides = 61

My HDL/TC ratio is 68/194 x 100 = 35% > 24%

My triglyceride/HDL ratio is 61/68 = 0.89 < 2

As you can see from the ratio calculations, LDL is not even a factor considered in assessing heart disease risk. This indicates that lowering LDL does not have as much influence in lowering your risk as raising HDL and lowering triglycerides levels do.

3) NMR lipoprofile: This test measures the “bad” LDL levels discussed above, the “smaller more damaging LDL particles.” These particles can cause inflammation and are also connected with insulin and leptin resistance.

4) Check your fasting insulin: Normal insulin levels are under 5, but should ideally be under 3.

5) Check your fasting blood sugar: Those with a fasting blood sugar of 100-125mg/dl have almost 3 times the risk for heart disease than those with levels under 79mg/dl.

6) Waist to hip ratio (waist measurement/hip measurement) is a much better indicator than Body Mass Index (BMI) because BMI underestimates obesity rates by not accurately measuring your visceral, or belly fat. An ideal ratio for men is under 0.8. For women, the ideal ratio should be under 0.7. A ratio over 1 for men and over 0.85 for women is considered high risk.

7) Iron levels: Excess iron levels can potentially damage blood vessels, increasing the risk for heart disease. Check your ferritin levels and make sure they are under 80mg/dl. The best way to get rid of excess iron is donating blood.

Should I take statins if I am at risk or already have heart disease?

I rarely, if ever, prescribe statins. And if a patient comes to me on a statin, I will usually take them off the statin and use diet, supplements, and herbs to treat them. The only benefit that has been seen with statins is with middle-aged men who already have documented heart disease (according to cardiologist Dr. Stephen Sinatra) or those born with a genetic defect called familial hypercholesterolemia which prevents them from normalizing cholesterol levels (these patients come in with extremely high numbers: TC >300 and triglycerides > 400). Even then, your total cholesterol levels do not need to be lowered below 150mg/dl nor does your LDL need to be below 70mg/dl. Lowering your cholesterol to these levels puts you at risk for cognitive issues including depression (low cholesterol levels may indirectly link to lower serotonin levels in the brain since cholesterol is needed in nerve cell membranes for serotonin receptors to work properly), memory loss, and Alzheimer’s dementia (with low HDL levels as a risk factor). Instead, use the ratio calculations above to make sure your lipid profile is in the optimal range.

Another valid reason to take the lowest dose of statins, if you must take them, is because there have been hundreds of studies (900!) validating the damaging side effects from statins including muscle pain, cognitive loss, neuropathy, anemia, frequent fevers, cataracts, and sexual dysfunction. In addition, studies have shown that lowering cholesterol levels with statins don’t lower mortality rates from cardiac related deaths but actually increase the mortality of cancer. Researchers now also believe that high LDL levels are not the culprit of heart disease risk since those people dying from heart related diseases had the lowest levels of cholesterol ever (i.e., the 3 year mortality rates of heart attack patients with low LDL were twice as high)!

Also, if you are taking a statin — you must supplement with at least 100mg of CoQ-10 daily (if not 200-300 mg) as this is depleted in those taking statins. And if you are over 40, it is better to supplement with the ubiquinol form of CoQ-10 (more about this later).

Coming soon: I’ll talk about effective ways to improve your cholesterol health and prevent heart disease. For now, be comforted in knowing that eating foods high in cholesterol and saturated fats such as eggs and uncured bacon, as well as foods high in unsaturated fats such as avocados are a step in the right direction towards these goals.

What does your cholesterol profile look like?

In health and wellness,
Dr. Elain

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10 Fruits and Vegetables That Can Help Prevent and Treat Diabetes

March 30, 2015
Rainbow Carrots

In Loving Memory of Cher Lee

With a prevalence of over 30 million people with diabetes and 86 million people living with prediabetes in the United States(1), most of us will be affected by this disease, whether you have diabetes yourself or know of someone who has it. It is the 7th leading cause of death in the world, but if not kept in check can lead to even more devastating ailments, such as heart disease, which is the leading cause of death in the world(2). I compiled a list of common fruits and vegetables you should include in your diet to help prevent diabetes.

1.) Carrots have a neutral thermal nature (read about the thermal nature of foods here) and sweet flavor (read about the five flavors of food here). It is a chi or (qi) tonic and benefits almost every organ system, but especially the liver, lungs, and stomach. It is a blood sugar stabilizer, treats indigestion associated with heartburn and increased stomach acid, and can prevent constipation. In addition, carrots are the most abundant source of beta-carotene, the pre-cursor of Vitamin A, which improves night vision and prevents cataracts.

Caution: Carrot juice is sweet and overconsumption may weaken kidneys. Don’t drink more than four cups of juice daily.

2) Sweet potatoes and yams have a cooling thermal nature, sweet flavor, and strengthen the spleen-pancreas and digestive system. It strengthens the kidneys and is also a good source of Vitamin A, with the darkest orange flesh colored yams having the highest amount of beta-carotene. They help stabilize blood sugar levels, like the carrot, but also improve our body’s response to insulin. It tonifies your chi, blood, and yin (read about the basics of yin and yang theory here).

Caution: Overeating sweet potato can lead to indigestion and abdominal swelling.

3) Artichokes have a sweet flavor and are an excellent source of inulin, reducing the body’s need for insulin. It is a blood and yin tonic, making them helpful in anemia, and also strengthen the liver and gallbladder. It contains the phytochemical cynarin, increasing bile production and aiding digestive diseases caused by inadequate fat assimilation. Cynarin also lowers blood cholesterol levels and improves blood-clotting time. Artichokes are also a good source of Vitamin C.

4) Asparagus have a slightly cooling thermal nature and bitter, mildly pungent flavor. It is good for the kidneys, lungs, and spleen. Asparagus clear excess heat, toxins, and water in your body, hence also making it a great diuretic since it has asparagine in it, which gives it its characteristic urine odor. Like artichokes, asparagus also contain inulin. It is also helpful in cardiovascular issues such as high cholesterol, high blood pressure and arteriosclerosis.

Caution: Too much asparagus can also irritate the kidneys.

5) Green beans, or haricot vert have a neutral thermal nature with a sweet flavor, supporting the spleen and kidneys. They increase the yin of the body (e.g., fluids and hormones). They have diuretic properties and help treat diabetes. Fresh beans have Vitamin A, B-complex, calcium and potassium.

6) Pears have a cooling thermal nature with sweet and slightly sour flavor. It nourishes the lungs, eliminating mucus and can quench thirst. Pears have been used to treat diabetes, cough, and constipation.

Caution: Don’t eat pears when you feel internally cold or have diarrhea.

7) Purple plums are slightly cooling, while yellow plums are neutral. They have a sweet and sour flavor and support the bladder, liver, large intestine, stomach, and spleen. They are helpful in digestion, quench thirst, and relieve constipation and dehydration.

Caution: Eat with caution if you have sensitive digestion, stomach ulcers, or inflammation. They have a high content of oxalic acid, so eat in moderation to prevent depleting calcium in your body.

8) Coconuts have a warming thermal nature, sweet flavor, and eliminate wind (one of the external pathogenic factors that I will discuss later). It is hemostatic (stops bleeding) and strengthens the heart. It greatly quenches thirst and builds yin fluids in the body. It is helpful in eliminating edema from diabetes and heart problems. It is fairly high in iron, phosphorus, and zinc.

9) Lemons and limes have a cooling thermal nature and very sour flavor. It helps the liver and can increase bile formation, increase mineral absorption, promote weight loss, and treat high blood pressure. It increases fluid production in the body, thereby treating the fluid deficiency seen in cramps and diabetes. Lemons are high in Vitamin C, Vitamin B1, and potassium. I will have to dedicate a post to lemons and limes later because of its many healing properties.

Caution: Use with caution if you have too much stomach acid or ulcers.

10) Blueberries are cooling and support the lung, spleen, and stomach. They are an excellent antioxidant helping to slow cell deterioration. I included blueberries in this list because it supports eye function and protects against macular degeneration. Ocular issues are common sequelae seen in diabetics, a microvasular disease. Blueberries also nurture the kidney’s yin function, which is often depleted in diabetics.

Start eating more of these fruits and veggies!

In health and wellness,
Dr Elain

References:

(1) Current Diabetes Statistics
(2) World Health Organization (WHO) – The top 10 causes of death
Healing with Whole Foods by Paul Pitchford
The New Whole Foods Encyclopedia by Rebecca Wood

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